IPI International Potash Institute
IPI International Potash Institute

Some soil properties of the Gilat soil in the LTFE

                         
  Table 1. Some soil properties of the Gilat soil.1  
  Layer Horizon pH EC 1:1 CaCO3 Clay Silt Sand Org C Org N  
    Fine Coarse    
  cm   dsm-1 %  
  0-25 Ap 8.2 1.2 18.6 16.5 33.2 46.3 4.0 0.70 0.075  
  25-40 B1 8.2 0.9 28.0 22.0 39.9 35.4 2.7 0.77 0.078  
  40-80 B2 8.3 0.7 28.9 23.0 43.2 30.4 3.4 0.73 0.075  
  80-120 B3 8.3 0.6 21.1 25.9 38.9 30.6 4.6 0.67 0.084  
  Note: 1 The data was derived from Feigin and Hidesh (1969). The untreated soil mineralization potential at field capacity conditions is 1.5% of the soil organic N per year (0-20 cm soil layer), which is equivalent to ~30 kg N ha-1yr-1 (Feigin and Sagiv, 1988). The soil volumetric water content at air dryness and field capacity are 3.5% and 23%, respectively. The mineral composition of the soil is quartz (45-60%), clay minerals + micas (10-20%), plagioclase (10%), K-feldspare (10%) and calcite (10%). The major clay mineral is illite-smectite (montmorillonite). The soil chemical composition is 61% SiO2, 7% Al2O3, 3% Fe2O3, 11% CaO, 1.7% MgO and 1.2% K2O. All the above mentioned results were very similar (within the range of analytical error) in the 0-20 and 20-40 cm soil layers. The cation exchange capacity (CEC) of the soil is 9.7 - 10.9 mmolc 100 g-1, the range covering the time and treatments span of the experiment. Calcium (Ca) and potassium (K) constitute ~50% and ~15% of the CEC, respectively. The source of all these results is Sandler et al. (2009).